PV Parents Call on School Board to Resolve Threat of Murder Suspect Attending PV High School

The Daily Breeze reports on a parent group upset that PV High allowed a suspect in a gang murder to continue attending PV High. From the article:

On Monday, attorney Jeffrey Lewis said about a dozen parents forming the group Residents Against Gangs at School sent a letter to the Palos Verdes Peninsula school board asking for Terrell to be removed from campus and home-schooled, or transferred to a continuation school. He said the district was “needlessly exposing itself to moral and financial liability should any harm befall any student due to Terrell’s continued attendance at school.”

“The Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified School District has been silent about what steps are being taken to protect Palos Verdes children from Terrell and his accomplices,” the letter said. “While Terrell does enjoy the presumption of innocence in a court of law, there are serious safety concerns raised by Terrell’s continued attendance at school. At best, Terrell is a distraction to teachers, staff and other students. At worst, most law enforcement officers would say that allowing an 18-year old gang member suspected of a felony to attend a high school presents a clear and present danger to other students.”

Judge rules Palos Verdes Peninsula school board violated open meetings law

From Today’s Daily Breeze:

A Superior Court judge has ruled that the Palos Verdes Peninsula school board twice violated California’s open meetings law in 2016 as it was putting an end to an agreement to install solar panels in district schools.

Torrance Superior Court Judge William Fahey, in a tentative ruling Sept. 5 that likely will stand, sided with a group of residents who sued the Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified School District Board of Education for alleged violations of the Brown Act.

The prevailing parties were represented by Jeff Lewis.

Jeff Lewis will represent Ted Rall in First Amendment appeal over defamatory comments by the LA Times

Ted Rall is a political cartoonist and syndicated columnist. For many years his cartoons were run in the Los Angeles Times. The LA Times stopped running his work after the LAPD claimed that Rall made false statements about the LAPD in a Rall piece that was critical of the LAPD and chronicled an incident when Rall was handcuffed by the LAPD for jaywalking. Rall sued the LA Times for defamation. The LA Times brought an anti-SLAPP motion and the lawsuit against the Times was dismissed. Rall will appeal that ruling and I am honored to represent him in this important First Amendment case about the outer boundaries of the anti-SLAPP law.